The Residual Effects of Slavery: Clinical Implications for Training and Practice

Intergenerational approaches to family therapy examine generational influences on present-day relational functioning, but most training programs have not broadly examined the influence of historically traumatic events on clients. This workshop will conceptualize the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, as a historical trauma, and explore its clinical implications.

A theoretical model of the residual effects of slavery that helps inform clinical training will be presented and therapeutic interventions. Small-group discussions, videotapes, case vignettes and experiential exercises will be used to encourage participants to examine the intersection of the residual effects of slavery with self-of-the-therapist themes. Participants will acquire suggested interventions for attending to residual effects of slavery within their clinical practice. This workshop will be facilitated in the spirit of Sankofa that encourages us to “go back and get what was taken.”

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the residual effects of slavery with self-of-the-therapist themes.
  • Attain interventions for addressing the residual effects of slavery within clinical practice.
  • Explore the influence that the residual effects of slavery have had on descendants of enslaved Africans and those who are not.

Presenter:

Dr. Erica Wilkins, LMFT, Drexel University: Department of Counseling and Family Therapy, Director of Doctorate of Couple and Family Therapy Program, Huston-Tillotson University: former Director of Counseling and Consultation Center.


Date / Time:

Wednesday, December 12, 2018
10:00 am–4:00 pm

Continuing Education:

5 CE Contact Hours


Register Online:

Details Price Qty
Tuition$145.00 (USD)  


To register by phone or fax, click here.

Alumni of the Ackerman Externship Program and all current Ackerman trainees are eligible for discounted workshop tuition. Please contact the Training Department to register.

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